Everything counts in large amounts (thanks, Depeche Mode), & while it is indeed still very much a competitive world (one heightened in the music industry), the victorious are not always greedy. One of these individuals is Alan Manzi, a 20-year-veteran DJ spreading his seed of sound throughout Cambridge. His rank among the local nightlife scene is top-level because he allows the soul of the music from the ages to speak. Manzi is one of the eyes of a whirlwind of revolving door college youth & adults who choose to tend to alternate pastures. In advance of his upcoming Some Like It Hott party this Saturday, May 16m at the Lilypad in Cambridge, a part of Together and also featuring DJs Pete Moss, Caseroc, Randy Deshaies, and others, we recently chat about the formulation of Manzi’s party & its ’80s porno-inspired flyers, as well as the fondness of his residency @ Make It New.

Georgette Moiselle: “Well I guess Some Like It Hott, I personally prefer classical music” is a line from the 1959 satirical film featuring Marilyn Monroe, however, your dance party of the same name engages in a steamier genre of sound — how did the manifestation process begin for you?

Alan Manzi: During the MySpace era, my friend Alex from Queens and I were throwing the legendary 12 Inches of Pleasure parties (about a year after I began my residency at Make It New). While proud to be a part of these endeavors, I knew that I wanted an event over which I had complete creative control. The idea lingered in the back of my mind for five years before the manifestation of Some Like It Hott. I always knew what the party would be called, but other than the name, there is no connection to the movie.

What are some particular joys & struggles connected with maintaining a monthly event? How do you stay current in a city with revolving door youth & a culture of a new genre of sound every other weekend?

Sometimes the parties go as planned and one glance around a room full of hot, sweaty bodies smiling and dancing provides instant gratification. On the flip side, there are often many parties going on on the same night, and while the vibe is still there and good music is being played, there aren’t as many bodies, which I have to remember not to take personally.

I’ve been DJing for 20 years, going to parties for about 25, and I have seen people of all ages come and go, and what I have learned is to stick to the basics — not get caught up in sub-genres, etc. I book DJs that I like, that know what they are doing, and surround myself with people who want to get loose and aren’t hung up on being cool. There’s always going to be people who appreciate that.

Can you express the personalities of your loyal crowd & why a newcomer should feel compelled to become a steady member? What is your ideal vision for an evening?

The lure is the same both for the regulars and newcomers — it’s a time to unwind, to detach themselves from their jobs, their phones, their responsibilities. My ideal vision of an evening involves lots of sweat. Lots!


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I particularly enjoy your provocative flyers & imaginative event descriptions, which pop culture sources help stimulate their creation? What is the public response to your strategy?

I have always been intrigued by ’80s porn — the bad acting, awful story lines, cheesy music, terrible editing, VHS covers, and of course, the confidence of the ladies. Given that the name of the party is also a movie title, I thought, why not make the flyers like movie posters? A parody of sorts. And it grew from there. I always find DJ bios to be painfully bad and far too serious so decided to have fun with them. People seem to like them and I have received a lot of positive feedback. I have been told that people go to the event page just to read the bios. It’s a party, it should be fun. Not so serious.

How long were you a Resident at the Make It New weekly? Can you describe the environment & how your time there impacted you?

I was a resident at Make if New for close to nine wonderful years. As far as weekly events go, I can’t recall another weekly party being consistently electric for so long. It’s made me a better DJ, opened doors for more gigs, given me the opportunity to meet people that I wouldn’t normally and cultivate friendships that will last a lifetime.

You have had to resign that particular gig due to hearing loss. How are you feeling regarding this unintentional stage of your journey as a DJ?

As far as the hearing loss goes, I wish it could have been prevented. It’s made me not take things for granted as much as I did, made me change my diet, and take a break from loud music. Though it sounds cliché, I actually believe that this happened for a reason. I’m getting a lot better, but still cannot go out as often. I hope to get to the point where I can play out again, but if I can’t, I’m good with that. I am fortunate to have recently been part of a benefit run by the Make It New crew, at which they raised and donated money toward my medical bills. I cannot express how grateful I am for their support.

Your party during Together Festival is applicably the 30th edition, or XXX in Roman Numerals. What is the plot?

We’ll be decorating the Lilypad for the first time, and have a special guest, but there is no plot, just looking forward to hearing the Some Like It Hott residents, Caseroc and Matt Mello, along with original gangsters Lenore, Randy Deshaies, Robbie Huggs and very special guest Pete Moss turn the Lilypad inside out.

ODESSEY 617, NON COMPOS MINTIS, AND TOGETHER PRESENTS SOME LIKE IT HOTT :: Saturday, May 16 @ the Lilypad, 1353 Cambridge St., Cambridge :: 7 p.m., 21-plus :: Mass EDMC Page :: Facebook Event Page


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